VAR

I don't think we have a specific thread for VAR, but it feels like the sort of thing we'll keep coming back to, so here it is.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/57435400

Premier League to use "thicker lines" for offside calls. I'm really interested to know whether they tested all of the contentious incidents with the new #ThiccLines system, and how much difference it made.

Comments

  • edited June 11
    I said this when VAR first came out. Measuring to a millimetre makes a mockery of the linesman. It should have been the same ratio as the touch and goal lines. That would give a slight advantage to the atrack minded teams
  • Which lines are going to be thicker?
  • I'm obviously missing something here. If a player is offside by an inch, even if you draw a line 6 inches wide. an inch of it will still be beyond the 6 inch wide line of the defender, so he'll still be offside.
  • Apparently this is the way they do it in Netherlands. But I don’t watch Dutch football so idk how that works. Any Haller fans online today?
  • I don't quite get how the thickness of the lines changes anything, but I must be missing something.
  • A potential fix for the system could already be in use, over in the Eredivisie. The Dutch league gives a margin of error on the assistant referee's call, to avoid those instances when someone's armpit causes them to be offside.

    Using the same technology, the league simply has 5cm wide lines on screen, rather than the razor thin one-pixel ones of the Premier League. If the lines are touching, then VAR won't intervene - meaning there is effectively a 10cm margin of error for the assistant's decision.
  • Ok, that makes it clearer.
  • How does the thickness of the lines change that, though? Can’t they just implement the same rule with lines of whatever thickness i.e if the lines touch, VAR doesn’t intervene.

    I’m probably being a bit dim…
  • I think it's that if the lines are thicker, it gives a bigger margin of .. a tiny bit of the person could be offside but if there's overlap in the two sets of lines, they are judged 'on'.

    Or maybe I'm being dim.
  • I think it means you can be up to 10cm offside and get away with it. That is giving the linesman some 'error tolerance', which was previously ok, but preventing the West Ham v Liverpool howler.
  • I don't know about thicker lines but it would help if the people operating it were not so thick. =)
  • Follow the Dutch example. Any overlap is onside. The idea of a dedicated 'offside VAR official' - preferably a line judge, not a referee - might work well. We'll see....
  • I don't know about thicker lines but it would help if the people operating it were not so thick. =)

    Maybe they meant thicker linos…
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